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Report on the Class of 1953 Mini

Report on the Class of 1953 Mini-Reunion, October 2013

    With the sweet flavors of a June reunion still in mind, the class, a select group of volunteers of which, gathered again 'neath the shadow of the hills, Friday and Saturday, October 4th and 5th, to lift the glass, feast, and remember.  Those present, classmates, wives, and friends were: Dud Baker, John Dighton, Nancy and Woody D'Oench, Dave Doheny, Pete Fetterolf, Carol and Dan Fitch, Joy and Walter Flaherty, Connie and Don Goldstein, Barbara and Bob Howard and grandson Robert Carnes ('14), Derry and Tess Kruse, Happy and Todd Mauck, Bob (Tiger) and Daphne McGill, Jack and Mary Merselis, Art Murray, Bob and Liz Ouchterloney, Fred and Granthia Preston, Bob Sillcox and Sheila Thomson, and Barbara Weedon. Also spotted on Saturday at the football game were Ted Potter and Fritz (Carl) Liss. 

    A lecture at the Williams Museum of Art was the first event of the weekend.  Director Tina Olsen provided an eye and mind-opening illustrated talk on what art is. One bemused attendee left with the clear impression that just about anything, events included, can be perceived as art. We've come a long way since Rembrandt.

    Friday evening began at Hobson's Choice Restaurant on Water Street where the New York strip steak, among four choices of entrée, was superb, the other choices too, probably.  Drinks, cheeses, and crudites preceded the dinner. Everything was arranged by Todd and Happy Mauck with the assistance of Alumni Office liaison, Ashley Cart, granddaughter-in-law of our classmate, Ted Cart.  They made excellent provision for us throughout the weekend.

    The Reunion Jazz Band presented a concert in The Log, attended by classmates for whom the ninth decade of life does not mean an early bedtime hour. Not me.

    Saturday morning in Brooks-Rogers we revisited our past with a lecture by Richard Moe on President Franklin Roosevelt. We heard, among many tidbits of historical conjecture, that FDR originally rejected the thought of running for a third term, but entered the fray to continue his leadership through the gathering storms of war.  Some of us bought his book.  Some of us bought two.

    The tail-gate lunch at Weston Field is, for our class at least, a misnomer.  We ate chili, sandwiches, and sweets sitting beneath a big tent near the wooden stands, in the center of which tent was a large groaning board from which we served ourselves, and then sat in chairs around tables.  The football game versus Bates was disappointing (the Ephs lost 14 -10) not alone because of the outcome but due to the poor level of play. One would have thought, for all the misplays, that he was watching the NFL NY Giants.  But the sun was warm, the fall colors brilliant, and the company (from whence was supplied lots of sardonic comment on the game) engaging.

    After the game some of us (Barbara and I, I observed, were the only '53ers) attended a lecture on the Jewish experience at Williams, the subject of a recent book by Benjamin Wurgaft.  I went, in part, to hear if the particular obscenity of our generation at Williams was properly excoriated.  It was, if somewhat gingerly.  I don't usually ask questions at such gatherings, but toward the end of the session I raised my hand and voice and asked if it would be permissible for a gentile to offer little testimony. The audience laughed and the moderator let me speak.  If you are curious about my "testimony," let me know and I'll repeat it for you.

    Saturday evening's dinner was, as has become our tradition, at the Taconic Club House.  A few minor matters of class business  were conducted by President Dighton but mostly we did what we do best when we are with each other, talk... about not only where we have been but where we are, geographically, yes, and (dare I use the term and invite misunderstanding?) spiritually, more.



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